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Tuesday, February 5, 2013

Opium Dreams--Sex and drugs in Victorian England!

Scandalous rumors of half-clothed women and good opium drew good Victorian society to Chi Ki’s opium den.  To here Alison escapes, sneaking out every night after her drunken, abusive husband sleeps, fleeing into the arms of other men, and into a trap that has been laid.  What happens when her fate is tied to an author, who coldly manipulates lives to stimulate his art, a self-absorbed, playboy criminal, and an apparently good woman who secretly loathes her? 

Find out the answer in Jennie Giardine's debut novel Opium Dreams, now available through  Eternal Press.  The genre is Historical Romantic Suspense, and it centers around an opium den in 1883 London. 

The book can be purchased through Eternal Press at http://www.eternalpress.biz/book.php?isbn=9781615728725, or from the Amazon.com Kindle Store at http://www.amazon.com/Opium-Dreams-ebook/dp/B00BA9GOQE/ref=sr_1_1?s=digital-text&ie=UTF8&qid=1360102153&sr=1-1&keywords=jennie+giardine.  It soon can be purchased in print through barnesandnoble.com, amazon.com and other outlets listed on the Eternal Press website.

Here are some links to author Jennie Giardine's sites:

Website:  www.jenniegiardine.webs.com
Facebook: www.facebook.com/JennieGiardine
YouTube Video Trailer:  http://youtu.be/wOV7lNlU524
Email:  jenniegiardinesmith@gmail.com

Excerpt:
            Roberto paused thoughtfully. 
            “Did you ever see the great work of art by Piranesi?  It is called “Carceri d’Invenzione,” which means “Imaginary Prisons.”  The work reminded Coleridge of the dreaming mind on opium, and DeQuincey wrote about it too.  So vividly did Coleridge describe the etching, that DeQuincey knew of it without having seen it, for it is the quintessential opium dream world, the doom that awaits the opium addict.  The figures wander in a vaulted room with great staircases that cross back and forth, with the end nowhere in sight, solitarily wandering through some yet higher vault and some new staircase.  There is no way out.  Even every arch, which would seem to promise an exit, leads to yet another arch.  The space is limitless, but the feeling is claustrophobic.  Though the figures are solitary and do not mingle in groups, they are not alone.  They are watched.  They have invisible enemies.  They are self-absorbed and complacent, and do not know the danger in which they may be.  They could not warn each other anyway, for opium has made them scattered and solitary, with the human inclination to empathy vanished.  It is quite a powerful work of art.  You must see it.  Oftentimes, I feel like I am stuck in this same labyrinth.  I am fascinated and horrified by it all at once.” 
            He grew thoughtful as he studied her face….
            Whatever relief Agatha had felt a moment ago slid away.  She shivered with a sense of foreboding.  Roberto seemed entranced by this prison, amazed at the secret insular world of it, he, to whom she had just given herself so freely.  He had just unselfishly warned her to stay away from it, yet a piece of her was already in his prison. 

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